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    Document Summary
    - Report Published -

    Senate Document No. 28
    PUBLICATION YEAR 1993

    Document Title
    Law Enforcement Training

    Author
    Virginia State Crime Commission

    Enabling Authority
    SJR 53 (Regular Session, 1992)

    Executive Summary
    The Crime Commission's Subcommittee II received the final staff report on the study of law enforcement training at its October 27, 1992 meeting. The subcommittee approved the report for consideration by the full Commission. At its November 17, 1992 meeting, the Commission reviewed and approved the subcommittee's report, including its findings, recommendations and issues designated for further study.

    Senate Joint Resolution 53 (1992), sponsored by Senator Robert C. Scott, directed the Crime Commission to study law enforcement training, including current standards and technology, the need for improved delivery of training and the costs of implementing new standards and erecting appropriate facilities.

    During the course of the study, Commission staff conducted site visits to training academies, reviewed the results of a national survey of directors of law enforcement and standards and organized a meeting of local law enforcement executives. The data collected was carefully documented and analyzed in the subcommittee's final report.

    On the basis of this information, the subcommittee acknowledged that instructor support is critically needed at the state level for the Department of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) and at each of the nine regional training academies. In response, the subcommittee recommended that general funds be used to provide one paid, full-time instructor to each of the regional academies; establish a cadre of specialized core instructors; and create a position at the DCJS responsible for conducting and periodically updating the job task analyses which dictate criminal justice training. In addition, the subcommittee designated several issues pertaining to professionalism, ethics and training delivery for further study. Upon consideration of the findings and recommendations of the subcommittee, the Crime Commission concurred with the subcommittee's conclusions.